Skip to content

Harvest Creations: Gardening To Do for October

Follow Casz's Fiction Farm on WordPress.com
Things are still growing, but they are slowing down mightily.
Things are still growing, but they are slowing down mightily.

A little more on time this month – but not much because the past two days have all about tomatoes. The tomato plants have done their time. I got four buckets of green tomatoes that have been wrapped in newspaper and stored in the larder. Of course, this is after three or four harvests of ripe tomatoes that went in our bellies or made into tomato sauce, crushed tomatoes, bbq sauce, and salsa.

I'm apparently keeping Ball Mason in business this year.
I’m apparently keeping Ball Mason in business this year.

This weekend will be devoted to harvesting and processing sunflower seeds. This upcoming baseball season we won’t need to buy seeds at all. They will all be from our harvest. We’re very excited about that.

Farewell tomatoes; hello sunflowers and brussel sprouts.
Farewell tomatoes; hello sunflowers and brussel sprouts.

 

The month of September saw a renewed battle between farmer and pest. I lost an entire broccoli plant to cabbage worms, as I also lost one cabbage plant, too. This despite treating diligently with Bacillus thuringiensis (known at your garden center simply by Bt). They also took out two of my collard greens. But I have as many collard greens in my freezer as my family can handle. So I’ve been using the mature leaves of the remaining collard greens to feed my chickens or share with neighbors and friends.

 

Finishing the new flower bed will finally happen this weekend. As our neighbor sold their house, we’d like this bordering project done before the new people move in. Radishes, parsnips, and winter lettuces have been planted. Winter cabbage crop is being tended.

 

Propigating will also happen this weekend, as we had to aquire some coir for our proigation pots. Funny thing, they didn’t have it at the nurseries or garden center. We had to find it at the pet store in the lizard section.

 

Six entire shelves are filled with goodies I've preserved (canned) from my little microfarm.  Shelves hold 6-deep pints and 5-deep quarts.
Six entire shelves are filled with goodies I’ve preserved (canned) from my little microfarm. Shelves hold 6-deep pints and 5-deep quarts.

My October list looks much like my September one, but will include more “clearing” of done plants, for sure. So glad the weather forecast looks like it will cooperate for this weekend. Lots to do; lots to do.

 

October to do:

 

  • Continue to harvest, preserve harvest
  • Pest Control (as necessary)
  • Weed (this is important so that the spring we have less weeds)
  • Mulching with fallen leaves as available
  • Tend to new growth of winter plants (cover when temps drop too cold)
  • Continue pulling “done” plants and put compost down
  • Finish Propagating plants (strawberries, blueberries, honeysuckle, lavender, and cuttings from neighbor’s fruit trees)
  • Finish shade plant bed along south-side, north-facing fence
  • Firewood moved
  • Greenhouse plans
  • Plant successive spinach to overwinter, cover with mulch
  • Prune Roses, Blueberries
  • Plant spring-time bulbs in between lillies, irises, and peonies bed (new bed along driveway).
  • Plant garlic
  • Go through and find volunteer plants and move to appropriate spot (I have volunteer pansies, snapdragons, lupine, and other stuff I need to move to appropriate places).
  • Compost, compost, compost

What I’ve learned:

  1. Less collards, more broccoli
  2. No Russian Red Kale. I’m the only one in the family that enjoys it, the chickens aren’t too keen on it, neither are the ducks, and the neighbors don’t really want it either
  3. Better trellis system for peas and beans
  4. More artichokes; one less zucchini (three plants are plenty)
  5. One pumpkin vine was perfect
More artichokes, less zucchini
Artichoke flower as a reminder: More artichokes, less zucchini

 

How is your garden faring at the end of the high growing season? Have these little blog posts been helpful for you?

Not to be forgotten, the brace and the flock are still busy producing yummy eggs.
Not to be forgotten, the brace and the flock are still busy producing yummy eggs.
Published inChickensDucksHomesteadingMicro FarmingUrban Farming

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply